Buckfield factory produces commemorative White House Easter eggs

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BACKFIELD — Wells Wood Turning and Finishing Co. employees have never attended the annual White House Easter Egg Roll in Washington, D.C., but the event would not be possible without their participation. Ta.

A wooden Easter egg sits on a pile of dowels Wednesday at Wells Wood Turning and Finishing in Buckfield. Such eggs will be handed out to children at his 2023 Easter Egg Roll on the White House lawn in Washington, D.C., on Monday. Russ Dillingham/Sun Journal

The factory, which employs about 30 people, produces tens of thousands of commemorative wooden Easter eggs that are given to children in attendance. The eggs are also sold in his packs of five for collectors.

Simon Barney, the company’s vice president, said: “We have never participated in the annual Easter Egg Roll itself because our factory jobs keep us close to home.” “But it looks like a lot of fun for families, and we’re thrilled to help make this event so special. We’re proud to represent the state of Maine and offer beautiful little products.” I think so.”

The annual Easter Egg Roll, started by President Rutherford B. Hayes in 1878, is the largest public event held each year at the White House, with more than 35,000 people expected to attend. Children use wooden spoons to roll colorful eggs as they race across the South Lawn of the White House.

This year’s event will be held on Monday. A lottery will be held in March to determine who can participate.

Varney did not reveal the exact number of wooden eggs his company was supplying to the White House, but the time commitment was enormous.

“It’s a very long process,” he said. “It takes several months to complete, from the time an order is received until the product is shipped to Washington, D.C. Our employees do an excellent job of carefully moving the project through the various stages within the factory. .”

A wooden Easter egg sits on a pile of dowels Wednesday at Wells Wood Turning and Finishing in Buckfield. Such eggs will be handed out to children at his 2023 Easter Egg Roll on the White House lawn in Washington, D.C., on Monday. Russ Dillingham/Sun Journal

All work is done at the Backfield factory. A high-performance lathe is used to trim each piece of hardwood into an egg shape. After sanding and painting, it will be printed with Easter and White House themes.

“Color and design selections are provided by the White House Historical Society, which works directly with the White House on project details,” Barney said. “We don’t choose the colors or designs, but we do tweak the edges to make sure everything works well and blends together.”

This year’s colors are pink, orange, aqua blue, green, and a color called Biden Blue. According to Varney, Biden Blue is a custom color somewhere between navy and indigo.

Biden’s blue egg features a special Easter Bunny engraving with paw prints from his dog Commander and cat Willow. Other images of his four eggs depict the north portico of the White House and decorated Easter eggs. The back has the signatures of the President and First Lady.

The company also created a larger commemorative golden Easter egg featuring the festive bunny.

NASA sent one of the eggs to the International Space Station so astronauts could demonstrate the effects of gravity to schoolchildren.

Wooden eggs are not used in the actual tamagoyaki. An egg producer in Nashville, North Carolina, will supply more than 30,000 real eggs that will be cooked and dyed to match the wooden eggs.

A wooden Easter egg, like the one used in the 2023 Easter Egg Roll at the White House, is placed on a pile of dowels at Wells Wood Turning & Finishing in Buckfield Wednesday afternoon. Russ Dillingham/Sun Journal

Wells Wood Turning, which opened in 1985, has partnered with the White House for years through multiple administrations to produce collectible wooden eggs, Burney said. The company also offers custom eggs for museums, gift shops, hotels and charities. Among them is a golden egg inspired by Hannibal Hamlin’s home that will benefit the Paris Hill Academy restoration project.

“It’s absolutely amazing how much joy wooden eggs can bring,” Varney said.

When they’re not making eggs, they also make rolling pins, dowels, tool handles, knobs, baseball bats, and parts for high-end furniture.


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